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Should the Pro Bowl be Taken Seriously?

NFC quarterback Aaron Rodgers of the Green Bay Packers (12) catches a batted down ball over AFC tackle Geno Atkins of the Cincinnati Bengals (97) during the 2012 Pro Bowl at Aloha Stadium. Kyle Terada-US PRESSWIRE

Last Sunday, 48,423 fans came to Hawaii to watch the NFL Pro Bowlers battle it out for conference supremacy. Many others watched the game on TV. Truth would be told though, that the level of effort by both teams would seem almost like a normal practice at half-speed.

Of course, this is nothing out of the ordinary from previous Pro Bowls. Over the years it actually seems like the little spurts of intensity that is involved in these games has somehow gone down each and every year. I understand it is a Pro Bowl and it’s suppose to be all about fun and games, but does anyone know how to play with some effort AND have fun at the same time? Heck, I do that every time I place a game of backyard football.

Aaron Rodgers seemed to see the same issue that I was seeing after he posted a few comments about the level of ‘effort’ that was being used by some of his teammates on Twitter. He posted, “the fans paid money to watch the pro bowl in person. I know no one wants to get hurt but on a couple plays the effort was really bad don’t u think?? If u wanna rip me for that go ahead. I think those in attendance and watching on TV would agree.”

Quite frankly, A-Rod was still being generous by saying it was only on a “couple of plays” because this seemed to be the case for the majority of the game. The thing that really gets me is how there actually is an incentive to winning the Pro Bowl with the winning team getting $50,000 and the losing team only getting $25,000.

I guess that just tells you how much NFL players really value money anymore …

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