Thirty Sundays to NFL football: 30 reasons why we love the Green Bay Packers

Don Majkowski with the guy who succeeded him as Packers quarterback. Raymond T. Rivard photograph
Don Majkowski with the guy who succeeded him as Packers quarterback. Raymond T. Rivard photograph /
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James Lofton during a visit to Lambeau Field as an alumni. Raymond T. Rivard photograph
James Lofton during a visit to Lambeau Field as an alumni. Raymond T. Rivard photograph /

James Lofton

From the first to the last of his 530 career receptions in Green Bay we knew that James Lofton was a special talent.

Unfortunately for Lofton, he never had the opportunity to win a championship in Green Bay and was traded out of town after he was accused (but never convicted) of sexual assault. That was not only unfortunate for Lofton, but for the Packers because he went on to play another seven years in the league and appeared in Super Bowls with the Buffalo Bills (but never won).

James Lofton is a Westwood One Radio commentator these days. Raymond T. Rivard photograph
James Lofton is a Westwood One Radio commentator these days. Raymond T. Rivard photograph /

Drafted out of Stanford in 1978, Lofton helped open up the Packers offense. It wasn’t that he caught an enormous number of passes during his time in Packers News, but it was his per-catch average that catches your eye – 18.2.

While with the Packers he caught 530 career passes in nine years for 9,656 yards and 49 touchdowns.

His athleticism and ability to get open downfield were Lofton’s attributes that frustrated defensive backs during that era.

He was a huge talent that didn’t play on very good teams … though the 1982 team did win the division and advanced to the divisional round of the playoffs, that’s the closest Lofton got to a Super Bowl with the Packers.

Lofton was by far one of the most skilled and productive receivers in Packers history. For that, we loved how he played and the memories he produced for all Packers fans.

Next: Lynn Dickey