Green Bay Packers: 12 players that need to go this offseason

LANDOVER, MD - JANUARY 10: Inside linebacker Clay Matthews
LANDOVER, MD - JANUARY 10: Inside linebacker Clay Matthews /
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DETROIT, MI – DECEMBER 31: Brett Hundley
DETROIT, MI – DECEMBER 31: Brett Hundley /

6. Lance Kendricks

The Milwaukee native has been a total waste and couldn’t rise to the occasion when his team needed him most following Martellus Bennett’s mid-season release. About the only thing Kendricks could be counted on for in his one (and hopefully only) season in Green Bay was dropping catchable balls (see 51-percent catch rate). His efforts as a run blocker were just as unsightly, as he ranked 49th among his tight end peers in that category, according to PFF. The position is in dire need of a complete overhaul.

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5. Jahri Evans

Securing the grizzled veteran for $2.25 million was a brilliant move on the part of Ted Thompson, who viewed Evans as a stopgap starter that the team needed after T.J. Lang’s departure. One solid year is all they needed out of the 34-year-old guard as the Packers went all in on trying to win the Super Bowl.

The former Saint to his credit did a praiseworthy job of providing a physical presence upfront and performed especially well as a run blocker. But as the season progressed, it was evident that Evans was wearing down and while the size/strength component is still there, he is now sorely lacking in the area of lateral agility. Moving on from the interior lineman would be well advised before things get worse.

4. Brett Hundley

Yes, he’s young and he can use his feet to scramble for big yardage, but beyond that, what does Hundley offer? Three years into his Packers’ career, No. 7 still looks like a rookie in terms of his decision making and pocket presence. The coaching staff never seemed quite comfortable in opening up the playbook with Hundley taking snaps, as Jamaal Williams became the one and only focal point of the offense down the stretch.

The fact that the one-time 5-star recruit averaged 5.8 yards per attempt was the product of conservative play calling and the quarterback’s inability to consistently display any sort of deep-ball accuracy. Rodgers remains the cream of the crop among NFL signal callers, but better insurance is needed as the two-time MVP advances into his mid-thirties.